SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND
A personal and eclectic approach to the past; an aesthetic of intense light and color with no visible source; a willingness to test the boundaries of complexity and confusion, extravagance and excess; light, even frivolous, decoration conceived of as high-drama; and multi- and mixed-media spectacles designed to induce a visionary experience: these are the hallmarks of late baroque and rococo architecture in southern Germany.  
Each installment of this on-going series focuses on a single 18th-century monument and its maker(s). Previous installments, listed below, can be found in the archive; still to come are Balthasar Neumann’s masterpiece Vierzehnheiligen; the library at Admont Abbey; architectural decoration and ornament at Schloß Brühl and the Würzburg Residenz; and Rococo theatre design in Bayreuth.
I. KLEIN ABER FEIN: ST JOHN NEPOMUK (ASAMKIRCHE)
II. THE PILGRIMAGE CHURCH AT WIES
III. KLOSTER NERESHEIM
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND
A personal and eclectic approach to the past; an aesthetic of intense light and color with no visible source; a willingness to test the boundaries of complexity and confusion, extravagance and excess; light, even frivolous, decoration conceived of as high-drama; and multi- and mixed-media spectacles designed to induce a visionary experience: these are the hallmarks of late baroque and rococo architecture in southern Germany.  
Each installment of this on-going series focuses on a single 18th-century monument and its maker(s). Previous installments, listed below, can be found in the archive; still to come are Balthasar Neumann’s masterpiece Vierzehnheiligen; the library at Admont Abbey; architectural decoration and ornament at Schloß Brühl and the Würzburg Residenz; and Rococo theatre design in Bayreuth.
I. KLEIN ABER FEIN: ST JOHN NEPOMUK (ASAMKIRCHE)
II. THE PILGRIMAGE CHURCH AT WIES
III. KLOSTER NERESHEIM
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND
A personal and eclectic approach to the past; an aesthetic of intense light and color with no visible source; a willingness to test the boundaries of complexity and confusion, extravagance and excess; light, even frivolous, decoration conceived of as high-drama; and multi- and mixed-media spectacles designed to induce a visionary experience: these are the hallmarks of late baroque and rococo architecture in southern Germany.  
Each installment of this on-going series focuses on a single 18th-century monument and its maker(s). Previous installments, listed below, can be found in the archive; still to come are Balthasar Neumann’s masterpiece Vierzehnheiligen; the library at Admont Abbey; architectural decoration and ornament at Schloß Brühl and the Würzburg Residenz; and Rococo theatre design in Bayreuth.
I. KLEIN ABER FEIN: ST JOHN NEPOMUK (ASAMKIRCHE)
II. THE PILGRIMAGE CHURCH AT WIES
III. KLOSTER NERESHEIM
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND
A personal and eclectic approach to the past; an aesthetic of intense light and color with no visible source; a willingness to test the boundaries of complexity and confusion, extravagance and excess; light, even frivolous, decoration conceived of as high-drama; and multi- and mixed-media spectacles designed to induce a visionary experience: these are the hallmarks of late baroque and rococo architecture in southern Germany.  
Each installment of this on-going series focuses on a single 18th-century monument and its maker(s). Previous installments, listed below, can be found in the archive; still to come are Balthasar Neumann’s masterpiece Vierzehnheiligen; the library at Admont Abbey; architectural decoration and ornament at Schloß Brühl and the Würzburg Residenz; and Rococo theatre design in Bayreuth.
I. KLEIN ABER FEIN: ST JOHN NEPOMUK (ASAMKIRCHE)
II. THE PILGRIMAGE CHURCH AT WIES
III. KLOSTER NERESHEIM
ZoomInfo

SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND

A personal and eclectic approach to the past; an aesthetic of intense light and color with no visible source; a willingness to test the boundaries of complexity and confusion, extravagance and excess; light, even frivolous, decoration conceived of as high-drama; and multi- and mixed-media spectacles designed to induce a visionary experience: these are the hallmarks of late baroque and rococo architecture in southern Germany.  

Each installment of this on-going series focuses on a single 18th-century monument and its maker(s). Previous installments, listed below, can be found in the archive; still to come are Balthasar Neumann’s masterpiece Vierzehnheiligen; the library at Admont Abbey; architectural decoration and ornament at Schloß Brühl and the Würzburg Residenz; and Rococo theatre design in Bayreuth.

I. KLEIN ABER FEIN: ST JOHN NEPOMUK (ASAMKIRCHE)

II. THE PILGRIMAGE CHURCH AT WIES

III. KLOSTER NERESHEIM

6wies, asamkirche, neresheim, spätbarock in süddeutschland, johann balthasar neumann, dominikus zimmerman, bavarian rococo, german architecture - 18thc.,

SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
ZoomInfo
SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM
The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.
Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.
The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.
The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.
Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.
In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810. 
With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
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SPÄTBAROCK IN SÜDDEUTSCHLAND III: KLOSTER NERESHEIM

The Benedictine Abbey at Neresheim is located in the eastern foothills of the Schwabian Alps. Beginning in the late 17th century, the monastery underwent a series of reforms, renovations and renewals of its purpose, its personnel, and its built environment. After much internal debate, in 1745, the decision was taken to build a new abbey church instead of rebuilding the old Romanesque church, which had been superficially updated to the Baroque style in the late 17th century. Abbot Amandus Fischer (1711-29) had brought in architect Dominikus Zimmermann to rebuild and redecorate the abbey’s Festsaal, which was carried out in 1719-20 in the high Rococo style.

Seeking stylistic continuity with his predecessor’s building program, Abbot Aurelius Braisch (1739-55) commissioned architect and building engineer Johann Balthasar Neumann to rebuild the abbey church in 1747. Neumann, the most sought-after architect in central Europe at the time, had designed the pilgrimage church of Vierzehnheiligen and the Prince-Bishop’s Residenz at Würzburg, which were admired for their formal invention, sumptuous materials and lightness of touch. Neumann’s plan called for a conventional basilica consisting of nave, crossing and choir which were articulated as a series of oval-shaped bays surmounted with shallow domes.

The groundstone of the new church was laid in 1750, but Neumann’s premature death in 1753 necessitated the finding of new builders willing to carry out his plans. Subsequent architects altered or abandoned the original design, particularly the construction and profile of the the domes, which slowed progress. The finished church, consecrated in 1792, should be attributed to Neumann with reservations or characterized as the work of disparate hands.

The domes were frescoed by Austrian painter Martin Knoller over the six summers of 1770-75. Seven scenes from the Life of Christ are depicted, including Christ among the Doctors, the Last Supper and the Ascension.

Johann Nepomuk Holzhey of Ottobeuren built the last of the great South-German, Baroque organs at Neresheim over the years 1792 bis 1797.

In 1802, the monastery was suppressed and secularized. Due to the disruptions caused by the Napoleonic invasion, custodianship over the abbey’s assets and property was granted to the Princely House of Thurn und Taxis for the years 1803-06. Afterwards, the Bavarian state assumed ownership. Both the abbey and the principality of Thurn und Taxis were annexed by the kingdom of Württemberg in 1810.

With the generous support of the house of Thurn und Taxis, the monastery at Neresheim was able to reopen in 1919, seeded by Benedictine establishments in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The abbey was church was restored in 1990 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

6neresheim abbey, johann balthasar neumann, martin knoller, bavarian rococo, spätbarock, german architecture - 18thc,

ephemeral-elegance:

"Jackson Pollock" Printed Dress, 1969
Halston
via Goldstein Museum of Design
ZoomInfo
ephemeral-elegance:

"Jackson Pollock" Printed Dress, 1969
Halston
via Goldstein Museum of Design
ZoomInfo

ephemeral-elegance:

"Jackson Pollock" Printed Dress, 1969

Halston

via Goldstein Museum of Design

Source: ephemeral-elegance

6halston, jackson pollock,

IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE

Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.

Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had  been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy. 

While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.

Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries. 
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that  the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical
ZoomInfo
IN LIVING COLOR: GREEK POLYCHROME SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE
Unadulterated whiteness is an essential component of Winkelmann’s interpretation of classical statuary and the search for the flawless, snow-white marbles by Neo-classical sculptors indicates that artists who measured the success of their work by the degree to which it adhered to classical conceptions of beauty felt that anything other than a clean, monochrome finish was an unthinkable violation of the Greek spirit. The restrained good taste of the late18th-century version of antiquity is compelling and still very much with us— but it is also all wrong. In the early 19th century, a preponderance of irrefutable, archeological evidence forced Europeans artists, critics and collectors to accept the disturbing proposition that ancient sculpture and architecture was not only painted, it was polychromed in garish, high-key, saturated colors.
Ancient texts about art production had alluded to sculptors “painting figures,” leading some scholars to suspect that ancient sculpture was painted, but the conclusive evidence for polychromy came from French architect and archaeologist. Jacques Ignace Hittorff’s excavations of archaic temple precincts in Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte. Archaic Greek art had been largely ignored in the 18th century, when the taste for classical and Hellenistic art prevailed. Methodical digging at the sites in southern Italy, Sicily and, later, the Athenian Acropolis itself, unearthed fragments of kouroi and kore statues, and deposed stones from Doric temples that retained traces of polychromy.
While working in Paris in the late 1820s, German architect Gottfried Semper became aware of Hittorff’s controversial theory, and after returning to Germany to assume the seat of Professor of Architecture in Dresden, he published his Vorläufige Bemerkungen (1834), wherein he argued that Archaic Greek architecture was polychromed so that it would visually accord with the quality of light he observed in the Mediterranean.
Hittorff promulgated an even more noxious threat to the Neo-classical model in his monumental study, La Restitution du temple d’Empédocle à Sélinonte, ou l’architecture polychrôme chez les Grecs (1851), where he fully proved that archaic art was polychromed, providing 30 colored plates in support of his work, thus putting the evidence before the general public for the first time, and he speculated that his theory could be extended to the classical period, a hypothesis that later generations or archaeologists subsequently confirmed to be true.
Over the last 100 years, the application of modern scientific technologies to the polychromy question has yielded a wealth of detailed information proving the near universal use of fill or partial polychromy in ancient sculpture, all of which Hittorff and Semper surmised merely by looking and thinking. Microscopic traces of colored paint have been found on masterpieces of greco-roman sculpture, such as the Augustus of Primaporta, that have been known and on view for centuries.
These discoveries led to the collaborative exhibition of polychrome reconstructions of well-known sculptures, called Bunte Götter (The Gods in Color),which traveled to 13 cities between 2003 and 2010. The initial encounter with the show’s loud, garish, even lurid, color-corrected figures was shocking, even visceral. The art of the Greeks, who invented philosophy, politics, aesthetics, history and logic, has, according to the restorers and curators more in common visually with the Simpsons and Pokémon than it does with Wedgewood. The familiar characters from AH101 all look like they just got back from Burning Man. The Chios Kore shared a wardrobe with Stevie Nicks and the Peplos Kore, previously assumed to be a sensibly-dressed maiden who wore flats, made the scene in Miami and Ibiza wrapped in a high-key, patterned yellow beach towel. H.W. Janson said that the deified Augustus was clad in body armor, when, in reality, he wears a skintight, Dolce & Gabbana spandex t-shirt with magenta and azure highlights. Janson didn’t mention the lipstick. When compared to the MDMA-induced Trojan archer or Cheshire Lion, Jeff Koons’ white sculptures look, well, Neo-classical

6polychrome sculpture, archaic greek art, jacques-ignace hittorff, gottfried semper, bünte götter,

RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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RADICAL DESIGN: COUNTER-CULTURE GRAPHICS 1966 - 1971
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J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
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J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo
J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo
J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo
J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo
J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo
J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo
J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo
J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo
J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”
— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 
ZoomInfo

J.M.W. TURNER: PICTURES OF NOTHING 

We here allude to Turner in particular, the ablest landscape painter now living, whose pictures are, however, too much abstractions of aerial perspectives, and representations not so properly of the objects of nature as of the medium through which they are seen. They are a triumph of the knowledge of the artist and of the power of the pencil over the barrenness of the subject. They are pictures of the elements, air, earth, and water. The artist delights to go back to the first chaos of the world, or to that state of things when the waters were separated from the dry land, and light from darkness, but as yet no living thing, nor tree bearing fruit was seen on earth. All is “without form and void.” Someone said of his landscapes that they were pictures of nothing, and very like.”

— William Hazlitt, “On Gusto” (1816)

 

6j.m.w. turner, william hazlitt, british painting - 19thc., landscape painting, maritime painting, john ruskin, royal academy of art,

THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
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THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo
THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo
THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo
THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo
THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo
THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo
THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo
THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo
THE DETAIL, Pt 1.
Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.
ZoomInfo

THE DETAIL, Pt 1.

Is Art History the study of objects or of images? The rise of the discipline coincides with the invention and rapid dissemination of photography. Photographs of works of art allow for the study of the art object at a remove; they also allow for selective study of decontextualized fragments of artworks. Denatured detail views, or details, alter and distort the viewer’s experience and understanding of art in subtle ways, usually giving the impression that the interest of a given passage is representative of the interest of the work as a whole. Nevertheless, the detail is ingrained in our viewing habits, and rather than trying to abstain from details, we should increase our self-consciousness about their function by looking at many.

Readers are invited to submit details they find compelling or useful or beautiful to the submissions area of this site. Please include a full caption including date and current collection/location.

THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
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THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
ZoomInfo
THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
ZoomInfo
THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
ZoomInfo
THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
ZoomInfo
THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
ZoomInfo
THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
ZoomInfo
THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
ZoomInfo
THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
ZoomInfo
THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 
— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.
The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center
The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.
The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).
Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).
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THE NEW CLARK

I like to accomplish art spaces that inspire viewers and evoke their creativity and freedom of thinking,” says Ando. “I have always been in awe of the Clark’s unique sense of place in nature. In both the Clark Center and the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, I have tried to express a deep respect for the landscape outside and an equal reverence for the art inside. It is critical that the art speak for itself and that viewers experience it in their own way. 

— Tadao Ando

The renovated and expanded Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to the public in July 2014. The project, which began in 2001, had three phases: the renovation and redesign of the existing buildings; the building, at a remove from the original buildings, of the Stone Hill conservation center; and the building of a visitor center to link the disparate sites together. The project’s architects were guided by the original wishes of the founders that the gallery spaces be “domestic” in scale, clearly lit, and provide views of the Berkshires countryside. Unlike the Barnes Foundatiom or the Walters Art Gallery, both of which opted to violate the conditions of their founding bequest in order to expand and alter their institutional profile, the Clark trustees made the bold decision to implement the founders vision more fully than the original building campaign had done.

The renovation and expansion of the existing buildings by architect Annabelle Selldorf began in 2007. The original museum, built by Daniel Perry in 1952-55 at the height of the Cold War under Sterling Clark’s direct supervision, was a neoclassical fall-out shelter—a reinforced concrete bunker designed to withstand a nuclear strike against Williamstown and preserve French Impressionism for generations to come; to this uncongenial monument, the Manton Research Center, designed by Brutalist architect Pietro Belluschi was added in 1973. Selldorff reorganized the layouts of both, gaining some 2,200 sq ft of gallery space and highlighting the collection’s strengths in decorative arts. The Belluschi building is now the home of a paper convervation center

The new buildings are the work of Tadao Ando, the Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize in 1995. The first to be built was the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, a conservation center set on a hill, at the end of a winding path. Completed in 2008, the Stone Hill outpost offers spectacular views of the Taconic Range, the Green Mountains, and Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts. The showpiece of the renovation project, the Clark Center, also designed by Ando, serves as an entrance hall to the museum building. Partially built below grade, the sleek, minimalist structure comprises 11,000 sq. ft. of temporary exhibition space, a retail facility and the Café Seven.

The Clarks’ concern for preserving the natural setting was taken as a mandate for full environmental sustainability. As the Institute is situated on wetlands, the landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand designed a series of reflecting pools, which at first seem purely decorative, but in fact serve as a water management and recycling system. The woodland trails around the property were expanded and integrated into visitor traffic patterns (the uphill walk to the Stone Hill Center will qualify as a hike for some visitors).

Current exhibitions at the new Clark include Make It New: Abstract Painting from the National Gallery of Art, 1950–1975 (2 August – 13 October 2014) and Cast for Eternity Ancient Ritual Bronzes from the Shanghai Museum (4 July –21 September 2014).

Source: lostprofile

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