A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
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A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo
A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo
A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo
A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo
A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo
A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo
A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo
A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo
A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of  Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.
ZoomInfo

A recent project caused me to view a fair amount of photography of both professional and amateur sports. I don’t know much about sports and I rarely watch televised games or matches, so I approach this body of imagery without knowledge of the personalities of players, the stature of the teams, the historic rivalries, or even the rules of play. From the points of view of photography and art history, however, I am able to say that A) despite the silly hype surrounding the revival of 3-D, the 2-D, still photographic image is alive and well in the sporting world, and B) that sports photography provides clear evidence for what Aby Warburg called the persistence of classical antiquity. Whether self-consciously invoked or drawn from collective memory, the formal language and conventions of ancient sculpture and its legacy— the serene abstraction of the archaic kouroi, the framing of the body by the canon of Polykleitos, the extreme emotion and drama of Hellenism, the idealization of Michelangelo and fury of Bernini are all on display, still guiding and informing almost all contemporary representations of athletics and the body in motion.

6classical sculpture, sports photography, gian lorenzo bernini, michelangelo buonarotti, polykleitos,